Crisp coconut cookies with fleur de sel

Five ingredients, easy to make, gluten-free, and addictive. This is a recipe I come back to again and again despite the fact I typically lack the patience for the monotonous repetition of baking cookies. These couldn’t be easier to make and are a great baking project to do with kids. The addition of delicate fleur de sel sea salt plays beautifully off of the sweetness of the cookies. My family and I mow through these at an alarming rate.

I have been making these for years from Swedish chef Marcus Samuelsson’s Aquavit cookbook. Although his list of ingredients and proportions are essentially the same as the coconut cookie recipes in common Swedish cookbooks his method is a bit different and I really like the result. I prefer to flatten the drops of batter before baking them so the cookies get really crisp and golden. More like chips than cookies.

The last time I made them it dawned on me to sprinkle fleur de sel sea salt over the tops just before baking. That inspiration came from the olive oil and fleur de sel crispie treats recipe posted by fellow blogger movita beaucoup. I can tell you those crispie treats are delicious as well, and just as challenging to my self-control as these coconut cookies.

The cookies will keep in an air-tight container for a week or they freeze beautifully and can even be eaten directly from the freezer which works out well if you have unexpected guests or you just can’t go another second without a salty-sweet coconut fix. If you are going for the crunch of chip-like cookies keep an eye on them as soon as they start to get golden on the edges. It won’t take long before they get too brown but I can attest that those taste good too even though they may not have as much eye-appeal. If you prefer a chewier cookie don’t flatten the drops of batter and remove the cookies when the edges are just golden. And for a real treat, use them in place of graham crackers for s’mores with nutella instead of chocolate as I suggested in my forget s’mores post. Make them large or small, chewy or crunchy, with or without the fleur de sel, but make them. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Coconut cookies with fleur de sel adapted from Marcus Samuelsson’s Coconut Cookies in the Aquavit cookbook
makes 4-5 dozen cookies

3 tablespoons (40g) butter
2 1/2 cups (200g) unsweetened shredded coconut
2 large eggs
2/3 cup (130g) sugar
1 – 1 1/2 teaspoons fleur de sel for sprinkling

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C) and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

2. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan. Remove from heat and add the coconut. Mix well so the coconut is well-coated with the butter.

3. Beat the eggs with a mixer on medium speed just until blended. Add the sugar and beat on medium-high until the mixture is light-colored and fluffy. Combine the butter-covered coconut gently with the egg mixture and mix well.

4. Drop the batter onto the parchment-covered baking sheets and press down gently on the mound until it is relatively flat. A teaspoon of batter works well but you can make them smaller or larger adjusting the baking time accordingly. Keep about an inch (2.5cm) of space between each cookie, more if you aren’t flattening them. Bake for 7-10 minutes until golden. Remove from the oven and immediately sprinkle the tops of each cookie with a pinch of the fleur de sel. If the cookies sit and cool too much the fleur de sel won’t stick. You could apply the salt before baking but since it dissolves so quickly you will lost the visual effect of the beautiful crystals and the pleasant crunch when you bite into one.  Slide the entire sheet of parchment with the cookies intact onto a wire cooling rack. As soon as they are cool, put them in an air-tight container otherwise they will lose their crispness.

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Categories: baking, recipes

Author:mbnilsson

I'm an American immigrant to Sweden as of 2008. My blog is for people who like food, Scandinavia, or just think Swedes are hot.

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35 Comments on “Crisp coconut cookies with fleur de sel”

  1. February 5, 2012 at 4:54 pm #

    Those look wonderful. I love the texture of baked goods made with coconut – they’re always fabulously crunchy.

    • February 6, 2012 at 7:39 am #

      Baking these flat like chips takes crunchy coconut to a whole new level. And that little fleck of fleur de sel is to die for. Both of my kids were climbing up to the counter to take ‘sneak’ more.

  2. jennaladue
    February 5, 2012 at 5:29 pm #

    Thanks Maia! I have been looking for another gluten free cookie to make. Josh can no longer eat wheat since 2010. I will try this one, they look delicious.

    • February 6, 2012 at 7:41 am #

      Is it just wheat for Josh, or is it gluten altogether? I have to be gluten free now too so most of the recipes I post will reflect that.

      • jennaladue
        February 13, 2012 at 6:23 pm #

        It’s just wheat gluten and now he has turned mainly vegetarian! I will look to you for some ideas. These cookies are great-next time I am going to dip half of them in chocolate.

  3. Marla Trowbridge
    February 5, 2012 at 11:50 pm #

    These sound so good. Alas, coconut is a banned item in this house (tree nut issues). Eat some extras for me please. I love coconut.

    • February 6, 2012 at 7:42 am #

      Bummer. Those allergies are not to be messed with for sure. I can definitely consume some extras for you. :)

  4. February 6, 2012 at 2:25 pm #

    Thanks for the shout out!! Also, thanks for encouraging me to make more treats with fleur de sel. Aaaaaand thanks for helping me grow out of my pants…

    • February 6, 2012 at 3:47 pm #

      You are more than welcome. Your recipe sent my rice crispie treats addiction to a new level, and my pants size, so I thought it only proper to return the favor. :)

  5. February 22, 2012 at 11:17 pm #

    I have to try these. Tonight :).

    • February 23, 2012 at 9:01 pm #

      One of the great things about these is the ease of having the ingredients on hand. If you do give them a try, I’d love to know what you thought.

  6. February 23, 2012 at 8:53 pm #

    This looks like a fabulous treat. So happy to have found a treat that I can add to my now wheat free diet. Thank you so much.

    • February 23, 2012 at 9:02 pm #

      I have another wheat-free treat coming up if you aren’t allergic to almonds or dairy. I hope to post it in the next week so stay tuned.

  7. Sonia
    June 30, 2012 at 3:25 am #

    I have tried this recipe twice and the cookies do not get crisp at all the taste wonderful but they get fluffy and don’t look anything like this finished product. I am doing everything in the recipe. Any tips ladies? Thanks! :)

    • July 2, 2012 at 8:18 pm #

      Hi Sonia. Where are you located? I know that sometimes the coconut in the U.S. can be quite moist. What we get here in Sweden is very dry to begin with. Perhaps if there is too much moisture in the coconut to begin with, they will stay chewy. If the flakes feel soft, rather than crunchy straight out of the bag, try leaving them spread out on a baking sheet overnight, or even try drying them out in the oven a bit by turning it on the lowest heat just until it warms up, then turn it off and let the coconut sit on the baking sheet. Also, be sure to flatten out the cookies as much as possible before you bake them so they get really crisp. Good luck, and do write back and let me know if drying out the coconut worked.

      • mary ann
        August 4, 2013 at 7:13 am #

        Hi– yes, I’m in the U.S. What I used was organic unsweetened coconut that I bought in bulk. It appeared to be a lot dryer than what I’ve seen in packages, but never having bought coconut outside the U.S., I don’t have anything to compare it to ;) I was trying to duplicate some crispy cookies that I’d just purchased, but had accidentally tossed the ingredients list. These came pretty close!

    • mary ann
      August 2, 2013 at 9:11 am #

      Hi –I was concerned that I’d end up with something a little too macaroon-like, so I used only one egg and one cup of coconut and the cookies are VERY crisp, with just a hint of chewy-ness. I flattened them slightly and I also baked them for 14 min. to really brown them up. A nice variation, if you’re not into extra salt, is to sprinkle them with some black sesame seeds. Thank you for the inspiration, Maia!

      • August 3, 2013 at 4:28 pm #

        Hi Mary Ann. Are you located in the U.S.? Coconut there tends to have much more moisture in it, so it’s good to know if that is what you were using. Interesting twist with the black sesame seeds! Thanks for your comment and for sharing your tips. :)

  8. October 29, 2012 at 5:26 am #

    These look delicious!! I love coconut, and coconut cookies?! Sounds amazing. Can’t wait to try these!

    • October 29, 2012 at 8:33 pm #

      Thanks for taking the time to comment. I really do love them. Just made them last week in fact. :)

  9. KJC
    November 3, 2012 at 3:04 pm #

    Any suggestion for swapping the sugar for maybe honey or agave? We are trying to avoid processed sugar, but these look so good I may consider using turbinado!

    • November 4, 2012 at 9:20 pm #

      I tried making them once with brown sugar, but preferred them with white. Honey might be interesting to try. I’d love to konow if you try an alternative sweetener and how it works out.

  10. Cassi Spigle
    January 20, 2013 at 11:28 pm #

    Are you using the whole egg or just the whites? It appears to be whites only in your mixer shot?

    • January 21, 2013 at 8:56 pm #

      Hi Cassi, it’s actually the whole egg. But you beat them on high speed with the sugar until they become light and fluffy, so that is what you are seeing in the photo. :)

  11. Amy
    March 25, 2013 at 5:58 pm #

    I cannot find the fleur de sel anywhere local. Is it ok to use plain old sea salt? I am hoping to make these two days from now for a potluck.

    • March 25, 2013 at 11:05 pm #

      Hi Amy. I don’t know that I would recommend plain sea salt in this case. Fleur de Sel is really a finishing salt that is very delicate in it’s flavor, and appearance. Here is a good article about basic salt differences. http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-deal-1-6515

      Since the salt is the last step, you could always try sprinkling a couple of test cookies with ordinary sea salt to see if you like the taste. Otherwise, you can skip the salt on top all together. If you do try the sea salt and end up liking it, please come back and post. It would be interesting to hear.

      Although you won’t have fleur de sel for this batch of cookies, I do recommend ordering some for future use. It really is exceptional and worth the money. Not just for an extra something special in these cookies, but on so many things as an elegant, last touch.

  12. Rena U
    June 11, 2013 at 2:28 am #

    Can you make these with stevia instead of sugar? Will they still turn out chewy/crisp?

    • June 30, 2013 at 12:21 pm #

      Please excuse my late reply. Your message came to me while I was out on vacation and then got buried in the inbox. I don’t know if stevia will make a difference in the end result. If you have given it a try, please do let me know how it turned out.

  13. August 27, 2013 at 9:02 pm #

    These look sublime. You had me at “mow at an alarming rate”. Making today!

  14. arcainmech
    September 8, 2013 at 8:10 pm #

    added cinnamon vanilla and 1/2 a cup of bisquick glutin free makes a nice chewy cookie that gets eaten faster than i can cook them

    • September 8, 2013 at 10:30 pm #

      Thanks for the tip! If only I could get gluten free bisquick. I would also really appreciate some gluten free rice krispies. :/

  15. heidi
    March 6, 2014 at 8:51 am #

    Just made them..taste like macaroons..:-)

  16. Colleen
    April 7, 2014 at 4:14 pm #

    after cooling – spread the bottom with nutella or any hazelnut chocolate spread. YUM!

    • April 9, 2014 at 4:01 pm #

      ALWAYS a good idea. Did you see the idea to make them like s’mores with a melted marshmallow and nutella. Super yum.

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